BEECHCRAFT C-45 “EXPEDITOR”

U.S. NAVY BUREAU NUMBER 51338
FAA REGISTRATION NUMBER N5766

Brief History

The C-45, also nicknamed the “Twin Beech” was assigned to the 133rd Air base group in the late 1940s. The C-45 served as a utility transport and remained in the inventory until 1960. Most of the C-45 mission was to support the Minnesota National Guard State Headquarters staff. The C-45 and the civilian equivalent Beechcraft Model 18 is a 6-11 passenger, twin-engine, low-wing, conventional-gear aircraft that was manufactured by the Beech Aircraft Corporation of Wichita, KS. The first flight was on 15 January, 1937, more than 9,000 of 32 variants were built. This model saw service during and after WW-II. The C-45 flew in the USAF until 1963.

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Description

Cost: $78,000
Crew: 2 Pilots
Capacity: 6 Passengers
Length: 34 Feet, 2 Inches
Wingspan: 47 Feet, 8 Inches
Height: 9 Feet, 8 Inches
Engines: 2 Pratt & Whitney R-985-AN-1 “Wasp Junior” radial engines, 450 HP each
Maximum Speed: 225 MPH
Range: 1,200 Miles at 160 MPH
Service Ceiling: 26,000 Feet

Interesting Facts

The museum C-45 is actually a U.S. Navy UC-45J. The U.S. Army Air Corps also had a version of this aircraft they used for bombing and gunnery training, this aircraft was designated the AT-11 Kansan. The fuselage of this aircraft had small circular cabin windows, bombardier position in the nose and a bomb bay. The aircraft was also fitted with two machine guns, one in the nose and one in a dorsal gun turret. C-45s are a common sight at airshows, there is also one that performs aerobatic displays.